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explodingdog:

Crazy Monster is going digging.

explodingdog:

Crazy Monster is going digging.

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jour72312:

justin-singer:

"Copyright makes books disappear; its expiration brings them back to life."
(via The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic)

File under: redesign exercise

Very strong case for shortening the length of copyright (or at least increasing the burden on copyright holders to extend the length of their copyright).

jour72312:

justin-singer:

"Copyright makes books disappear; its expiration brings them back to life."

(via The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic)

File under: redesign exercise

Very strong case for shortening the length of copyright (or at least increasing the burden on copyright holders to extend the length of their copyright).

Quote
"We must do away with the absolutely specious notion that everybody has to earn a living. It is a fact today that one in ten thousand of us can make a technological breakthrough capable of supporting all the rest. The youth of today are absolutely right in recognizing this nonsense of earning a living. We keep inventing jobs because of this false idea that everybody has to be employed at some kind of drudgery because, according to Malthusian-Darwinian theory, he must justify his right to exist. So we have inspectors of inspectors and people making instruments for inspectors to inspect inspectors. The true business of people should be to go back to school and think about whatever it was they were thinking about before somebody came along and told them they had to earn a living."

Buckminster Fuller (via disorganization)

(via kenyatta)

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"we stole some of the city’s soul back from one of its forbidden vaults."

Photos: Inside An Illegal Party In An Abandoned Subway Station Deep Under NYC: Gothamist

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"But, of course, that’s also part of the new Silicon Valley parable: dream big, privatize the previously public, pay no attention to the rules, build recklessly, enjoy shamelessly, invoke magic, and then pay everybody off."

New Government Documents Show the Sean Parker Wedding Is the Perfect Parable for Silicon Valley Excess - Atlantic Mobile (via iamdanw)

Here it is with the links that were in that sentence:

But, of course, that’s also part of the new Silicon Valley parable: dream bigprivatize the previously publicpay no attention to the rulesbuild recklesslyenjoy shamelesslyinvoke magic, and then pay everybody off. 

(via kenyatta)

(via kenyatta)

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"Folk music sucks!" (via Cat and Girl » Archive » Luxe Be a Lady)
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pol102:

azspot:

What does that $14 shirt really cost?

A lesson in capitalism in one simple graphic.

This illustrates the breakdown quite well, though it does oversimplify the fact that while the retailer pays $5.67 for every shirt, they don’t sell every shirt for $14 (due to theft, damage, poor demand, etc) and the retailer has to pay their overhead (rent, merchandising, retail staff) out of that margin. But clearly, there is a lot of room on the bottom for the manufacturing workers in this chain to get a much larger slice without significantly impacting the retailer’s bottom line (e.g., you could double (100%) wages for garment workers & only cut into the retailer markup by $0.12 (2%)).

pol102:

azspot:

What does that $14 shirt really cost?

A lesson in capitalism in one simple graphic.

This illustrates the breakdown quite well, though it does oversimplify the fact that while the retailer pays $5.67 for every shirt, they don’t sell every shirt for $14 (due to theft, damage, poor demand, etc) and the retailer has to pay their overhead (rent, merchandising, retail staff) out of that margin. But clearly, there is a lot of room on the bottom for the manufacturing workers in this chain to get a much larger slice without significantly impacting the retailer’s bottom line (e.g., you could double (100%) wages for garment workers & only cut into the retailer markup by $0.12 (2%)).

(via kenyatta)

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"we quickly realized there were way too many parking lots in the real world and that our game was going to be really boring if it was proportional in terms of parking lots."

The Philosophy of SimCity: An Interview With the Game’s Lead Designer - Geoff Manaugh & Nicola Twilley - The Atlantic

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"Economists generally agree that one of the distinguishing factors between rich countries and poor ones is that it is much easier to start businesses in rich countries. In Ecuador, for example, it takes about 56 days and 13 separate procedures to get all the legal paperwork done to start a new business. In the United States, it’s an average of six days and six procedures. But if you want to open a mobile-food business in New York, it’s essentially like starting a business in Ecuador — and that’s if you can somehow arrange a permit."

The Food-Truck Business Stinks - NYTimes.com (via noneck)

(via noneck)

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kenyatta:

transpondster:

Kowloon City, Hong Kong
This explodes into a very large graphic for more detail

See also: photos from Kowloon Walled City.

kenyatta:

transpondster:

Kowloon City, Hong Kong

This explodes into a very large graphic for more detail

See also: photos from Kowloon Walled City.

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"We don’t make mayonnaise here."

Sriracha hot sauce purveyor turns up the heat - latimes.com

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"Past writers who imagined the future thought that as machines saved our time, we would have more time for leisure. That has not happened. Instead, since no one is self-sufficient, we must work in sales and marketing to convince someone with money to trade cash for our trinket, so that we can have purchasing power to access the natural bounty of the land. Average work hours declined for a century – and then started curving back upwards as the everyone switched the zero sum battle of sales and marketing. The future is here, and it is the sales desk at Dunder Mifflin."

Great Problems: The Rent-seeking Economy | Intellectual Detox

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thereconstructionists:

English mathematician and writer Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815–November 27, 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron as the only legitimate child to the poet Lord Byron and better-known as Ada Lovelace, is commonly considered the world’s first computer programmer — a title she earned by writing the very first algorithm designed to be processed by a machine during her work on Charles Babbage’s seminal Analytical Engine, the early theoretical general-purpose computer that laid the foundation of modern computing.
Abandoned by her father when she was barely a few months old and half-orphaned by Lord Byron’s death when Ada was only eight, Lovelace was led to mathematics and logic by her mother, who saw these strictly rational disciplines as an antidote to the madness she feared Ada had inherited from her father. But even as Lovelace came to indulge her mathematical mind, she insisted on referring to herself as a “poetical scientist.”
Still in her twenties, she was enlisted by Babbage in translating Italian mathematician Louis Menebrea’s memoir of the Analytical Engine, originally published in French. It was in the elaborate notes on the book, which she penned during a nine-month period in 1842-1843, that Lovelace wrote the algorithm which staked out her corner of history.
Lovelace was in many ways a rebel of her era: Though she and her mother inhabited the upper echelons of London society, women’s participation in intellectual affairs was both uncommon and discouraged. Even among the gentlemen who pursued such disciplines as geology, astronomy, and botany, there were no professional scientists per se — in fact, the very word “scientist” didn’t exist until William Whewell coined it in 1836. And yet Lovelace, a woman, was very much a scientist — in addition to being the mother of three children — and an intellectual peer of Babbage’s.
But besides a pioneer of computer science, Lovelace, whose eclectic interests spanned from music to mesmerism, was also in a way one of the world’s first neuroscientists — at least a theoretical one. In 1844, she grew intensely interested in creating “a calculus of the nervous system,” confiding in her friend Woronzow Greig a desire to develop a mathematical model for consciousness that would explain how nerve signals give rise to thoughts and feelings in the brain. But, largely due to her mother’s instilled admonitions about Ada’s inherited capacity for madness, she eventually abandoned the quest.
Lovelace died of uterine cancer, after a short battle terribly managed by her physicians, two weeks short of her thirty-seventh birthday. She is commemorated with one of London’s famous blue plates, located at St. James’s Square and inscribed “Ada Countess of Lovelace 1815-1852 Pioneer of Computing lived here.” Her contribution to modern life is imprinted on every interaction we have with a machine on any given day.
Learn more: Wikipedia | The Bride of Science (2000 biography)

thereconstructionists:

English mathematician and writer Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815–November 27, 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron as the only legitimate child to the poet Lord Byron and better-known as Ada Lovelace, is commonly considered the world’s first computer programmer — a title she earned by writing the very first algorithm designed to be processed by a machine during her work on Charles Babbage’s seminal Analytical Engine, the early theoretical general-purpose computer that laid the foundation of modern computing.

Abandoned by her father when she was barely a few months old and half-orphaned by Lord Byron’s death when Ada was only eight, Lovelace was led to mathematics and logic by her mother, who saw these strictly rational disciplines as an antidote to the madness she feared Ada had inherited from her father. But even as Lovelace came to indulge her mathematical mind, she insisted on referring to herself as a “poetical scientist.”

Still in her twenties, she was enlisted by Babbage in translating Italian mathematician Louis Menebrea’s memoir of the Analytical Engine, originally published in French. It was in the elaborate notes on the book, which she penned during a nine-month period in 1842-1843, that Lovelace wrote the algorithm which staked out her corner of history.

Lovelace was in many ways a rebel of her era: Though she and her mother inhabited the upper echelons of London society, women’s participation in intellectual affairs was both uncommon and discouraged. Even among the gentlemen who pursued such disciplines as geology, astronomy, and botany, there were no professional scientists per se — in fact, the very word “scientist” didn’t exist until William Whewell coined it in 1836. And yet Lovelace, a woman, was very much a scientist — in addition to being the mother of three children — and an intellectual peer of Babbage’s.

But besides a pioneer of computer science, Lovelace, whose eclectic interests spanned from music to mesmerism, was also in a way one of the world’s first neuroscientists — at least a theoretical one. In 1844, she grew intensely interested in creating “a calculus of the nervous system,” confiding in her friend Woronzow Greig a desire to develop a mathematical model for consciousness that would explain how nerve signals give rise to thoughts and feelings in the brain. But, largely due to her mother’s instilled admonitions about Ada’s inherited capacity for madness, she eventually abandoned the quest.

Lovelace died of uterine cancer, after a short battle terribly managed by her physicians, two weeks short of her thirty-seventh birthday. She is commemorated with one of London’s famous blue plates, located at St. James’s Square and inscribed “Ada Countess of Lovelace 1815-1852 Pioneer of Computing lived here.” Her contribution to modern life is imprinted on every interaction we have with a machine on any given day.

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  • NYC on-street bike lanes run one way, in the direction of traffic.
  • Give trucks a wide berth. It doesn’t matter if it’s your right of way. Truck is to you as you are to ant.
  • The cyclist climbing has the right of way over the cyclist descending.
  • TAKE OFF YOUR HEADPHONES! You need your ears to…

Not sure why this came back up via Prismatic but worth resharing…

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(via very small array » All Toll Roads Lead to Staten Island)